Citizens should be able to vote via the internet.

By Andrew Mackinnon

None of the predominantly white countries around the world, such as the United States of America, should have to continue to endure the enormous chaos that election fraud causes, whether it is detected or not.

In today’s highly technologically advanced world, it is the very epitome of insanity for governments to struggle to count the votes of citizens accurately and to have to laboriously recount paper ballots or laboriously audit the vote count arising from paper ballots when election fraud is strongly suspected to have influenced the results of the vote.

There is no reason why every single United States citizen, for example, should not be able to vote via the internet from the comfort of their own home on every single issue that their county representatives, their state representatives and their federal representatives vote on as their representatives, as well as in every election of county, state or federal representatives, if these representatives are still required under this system of voting via the internet.

United States citizens have been conducting their banking via the internet for many years now. It is highly secure. Even single-factor authentication involving just a single internet banking password guarantees this security, however it is easily possible to enhance this security even further by using two-factor authentication, if desired, involving a password and a second factor such as a random eight-digit number relayed via phone or via email, that must also be entered correctly before access is granted.

Just as United States citizens conduct their banking via the internet with confidence, it is more than possible to construct websites that enable United States citizens to log in as users via the internet using single-factor authentication or two-factor authentication, if desired by the users, and to construct databases connected to these websites that accurately record the votes that United States citizens cast in relation to county, state and federal issues, as well as in elections of county, state or federal representatives.

United States citizens who do not have access to the internet in their places of residence can vote via the internet by attending their county offices and accessing the internet available there in order to vote on any county, state or federal issue or in any election of county, state or federal representatives.

Whereas it takes many hours and even days for an entire team of poll workers to accurately count paper ballots, it takes a professionally designed and built database just minutes to automatically count the votes that citizens have cast and to produce the results of the voting on any given issue or in any given election of a representative.

The implementation of this system of voting via the internet for issues at the county, state and federal levels of government and for the election of representatives at the county, state and federal levels, necessitates that every United States citizen must be issued with an identification card by the state governments which contains their identification number, their full name, their address, their date of birth and their photo.  Every citizen would be represented by their identification number when casting their vote via the internet on issues at the county, state and federal levels of government and for the election of representatives at the county, state and federal levels of government.  Every citizen would maintain security over their voting activity by using single-factor authentication involving a password associated with their identification number or two-factor authentication, if desired, involving a password associated with their identification number and a second factor such as a random eight-digit number relayed via phone or via email, that must also be entered correctly before access is granted, every time they log in to vote.

This identification card would contain no information other than the citizen’s identification number, their full name, their address, their date of birth and their photo.  This identification card would not contain any biometric or electronically-stored information.  This identification card would not contain any radio frequency identification (RFID) chips.

The issuing of this identification card to every United States citizen by the state governments would also assist in determining who is residing in the country illegally without any right to be in the country.

The only way I can imagine being able to guarantee that the results of the voting on any given issue or in any given election of a representative have not been fraudulently manipulated after the voting has taken place and before being publicly published is for a list of the identification numbers of every citizen who voted, together with the respective votes that they cast, to be publicly published on the internet so that any citizen can verify that their vote has been accurately recorded and so that any citizen can download the list of the identification numbers of every citizen who voted, together with the respective votes that they cast, and import the list into a spreadsheet such as Microsoft Excel or into a database such as Microsoft Access and verify the results of the vote for themselves.  Under no circumstances would any other information be publicly published on the internet that identifies citizens who cast a vote, such as their name, address, date of birth or photo.

Every citizen who votes on an issue or in an election should receive confirmation of the manner in which they voted by email. If they later check the list of votes cast that has been publicly published on the internet, which identifies voters by their identification number only, and find that their vote has not been accurately recorded, they can use this email confirmation as evidence of the actual manner in which they voted on the issue or in the election in order to have their vote corrected.

Citizens should therefore be allowed fourteen days (i.e. ten business days) after the results of a vote have been publicly published on the internet to verify that their vote has been accurately recorded and to notify the electoral authority if they find that their vote has not been accurately recorded, by providing the email confirmation of their vote as evidence of the actual manner in which they voted, so that the electoral authority can correct their vote and update the results of the vote to reflect their corrected vote.

In voting on county issues or elections of county representatives, counties should compile the county vote results and verify their accuracy.

In voting on state issues or elections of state representatives, counties should compile the county vote results and verify their accuracy, before submitting these results to the states so that the states can compile the final state vote results comprising all counties in the state and verify their accuracy.

In voting on federal issues or elections of federal representatives, counties should compile the county vote results and verify their accuracy, before submitting these results to the states so that the states can compile the state vote results comprising all counties in the state and verify their accuracy, before submitting these results to the federation so that the federation can compile the final federation vote results comprising all states in the federation and verify their accuracy.

Under this system of voting via the internet, it is conceivable that instead of representatives proposing bills to be voted on at the county government, state government or federal government levels, United States citizens themselves could propose bills to be voted on by their fellow citizens.  Any bill proposed by a United States citizen would need a petition supporting the bill that has been electronically signed by a required minimum number of fellow United States citizens in the relevant jurisdiction, whether county, state or federal, before that proposed bill is submitted to all citizens in the relevant jurisdiction to be voted on for acceptance or rejection via the internet.

Bills proposed by United States citizens in any jurisdiction, whether county, state or federal, whose petitions supporting the bills have been electronically signed by the required minimum number of fellow United States citizens in the relevant jurisdiction, whether county, state or federal, would be queued in order to be voted on by United States citizens in the relevant jurisdiction in the chronological order in which their petitions supporting them gained the required minimum number of electronic signatures, with the bill whose petition gained the required minimum number of electronic signatures the furthest back in time being first in the queue for voting on by United States citizens in the relevant jurisdiction.

Under this system of voting via the internet, whereby United States citizens themselves also propose bills to be voted on, county, state and federal representatives would definitely not be required.

Any bill that is voted on by United States citizens in the relevant jurisdiction with the result that a majority of the citizens who voted support the bill, would be submitted to the government attorney’s office in the relevant jurisdiction for review to determine how to enact the bill as legislation.

If the government attorney’s office in the relevant jurisdiction finds no legal barriers to enacting the bill as legislation, then the government attorney’s office would approve the bill, rewrite the bill according to the legal standards in use by the government attorney’s office and resubmit the rewritten bill for approval by the citizens in the relevant jurisdiction in the form of another vote via the internet on the rewritten bill.  If a majority of the citizens in the relevant jurisdiction who vote on the rewritten bill support the rewritten bill, then it would be enacted as legislation in the relevant jurisdiction by the government attorney’s office in the relevant jurisdiction.

If the government attorney’s office in the relevant jurisdiction finds legal barriers to enacting the bill as legislation, then the government attorney’s office would reject the bill and publicly publish advice explaining in detail the legal barriers to enacting the bill as legislation.

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